Friday, 11 July 2014

No man is an island

World peace seems far off. An impossibility. It is difficult to understand how so many people think that killing others is justifiable, both morally snd practically. Why do so many think that killing is either desirable or necessary? How can there ever be peace in the Middle East? Why do the lives of ordinary, innocent people matter so little. Why do so many people glorify getting the blood of others on their hands. How do they justify, morally and practically, the blood of innocent people on their hands? Why do innocent lives matter so little? Why do nations feel able, and justified to take actions which result in the death and sufferings of so many innocent people?

Why do they not mind their own bloody business?

We ordinary people spend our time going about our legitimate business. We extend ordinary courtesy to our neighbours and to strangers in our midst. We give them directions when they are needed. We smile at each other, offer others seats on the bus, give directions to places if asked, we help mothers with children in pushers, we smile at others, and co-operate. We fall into casual conversations, we make the world go round. In our daily lives we recognise the importance of consideration and courtesy towards others.  I help the blind man off the bus, I give directions. Perhaps living alone makes me more aware than perhaps I was in the past to to the way little interactions help keep our society tolerant, helpful and generous in our everyday lives. When we ignore everyday courtesies, our hearts   harden, we ignore the needs of others and the ways in which societies function well.

If we maintain our essential civilities, we will, I hope and believe, ensure the ways we treat each other do not worsen.

2 comments:

Elephant's Child said...

Yes!
And when, and why, did we accept the obscenity of 'collateral damage'?

Molly said...

Here, here! If each individual would behave as you suggest the proble would be cured....any chance? But we can at least improve our own small orbits.